DAVID HUCHTHAUSEN

David Huchthause in his studio. M Stubblefield photo.

David Huchthause in his studio. M Stubblefield photo.

David Huchthausen was one of the first artists of the Studio Glass Movement to emphasize cold working techniques such as engraving, laser cutting, sawing, laminating, and polishing. Within his crystal-clear geometric forms, Huchthausen encases convex shapes and open bubbles, refracting light as it hits the shapes and reflecting colored glass patterns that the artist has also applied.  The colored glass patterns are sometimes made of dichroic glass, a composite non-translucent product made by stacking layers of glass with micro-layers of metals and oxides which, depending on the angle at which they are viewed, can cause an array of colors to display. Huchthausen’s narrative has always been enigmatic by design, challenging the viewer with its curious and unknowable quality.

With hundreds of one-man and group exhibitions on his resume, Hochthausen is considered a leader in the field. His work is represented in over 65 public collections, including: The Corning Museum(NY); The Chrysler Museum of Art (Norfolk, VA); The Detroit Institute of Arts (MI); The High Museum(Atlanta, GA); The Hokkaido Museum (Sapporo, Japan); The Los Angeles County Museum (CA); The Metropolitan Museum (New York, NY); The Museum of Fine Art (Dusseldorf, Germany)The Museum of Fine Arts (Lausanne, Switzerland)La Musée de Verre (Liège, Belgium); The Smithsonian Institution (Washington, D.C.); The Tacoma Art Museum (WA); and many more.